Hillcrest COVID-19 Call Center
Hillcrest HealthCare System has an established COVID-19 Call Center. Operators are available Monday - Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to answer patient questions, provide support and connect them to a provider. The Call Center line is 918-574-0920.

(918) 592-0999

Blog

They are daily decisions, but they add up and influence our heart health years for years to come. What we eat can either be of great help or great hindrance to our cardiovascular health, according to new findings. First, a recent study published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, says that the amount of fruits and vegetables we eat as young adults can help prevent heart disease as many as two decades later. Second, a small study in Kentucky suggests a poor diet can inflict early signs of heart disease in children. When it comes to heart disease, there are factors we can... Read More »

 “I told the guys I would be back in two hours,” 53-year-old Bill Calkins remembers telling his crew at work as he left for his annual physical in Skiatook. The project manager of a superfund site stayed up-to-date on his physicals and felt in pretty good health walking into the clinic. “If anything, I noticed I was slightly short of breath.” Going over his blood results, Bill’s primary care physician was wrapping up the appointment, when he asked, “Hey Bill, you’re in your mid-50s. When was the last time you had an EKG?” Bill thought the last time would have been when he was in the... Read More »

Oklahoma Heart Institute cardiologist Dr. Mathew Good’s wife, Bethany, joins us on the blog today with their family’s favorite game day foods.

In the Good house, fall means OSU football. And the Broncos. And the Royals. And then starting each November, KU basketball. Can you tell we love our sports around here?  Our kids literally wake up on the weekend and ask which team shirt they need to wear that day. Cheering on our teams is definitely a family event. A perfect Saturday would be spent tailgating in Stillwater, but life, busy schedules and three little ones don’t always make... Read More »

Anyone living with diabetes is at an increased risk of heart disease, whether that be suffering a heart attack or stroke. However, new research finds that women who have diabetes are 40 percent more likely to have a heart attack than men who have diabetes. “Two studies presented at the European Association of the Study of Diabetes (EASD) meeting confirm what we have suspected clinically for some time,” shares Oklahoma Heart Institute endocrinologist Dr. Cristin Bruns. “What is even more astounding is that the increased risk appears to start as young as age 45.”   Dr. Bruns says, although it... Read More »

“I’ve played football my whole life basically,” 17-year old William McKenney shares from his Tulsa home on a humid August afternoon. In just a few short hours, he will return to Booker T. Washington High School for six hours of pre-season football practice. “I love it. You’ve got to love the game to play it. I love the game.” The senior safety doesn’t mind putting in the work. After all, this is arguably the most important season of his career. “After high school I’d like to go on and if I get the opportunity to play college football and move onto the next level and play in the NFL, I’ll... Read More »

September is Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month, as well as National Yoga Month. Previously on our blog, we have shared what researchers are finding with regards to how a regular yoga practice can help patients with AFib. Today, Bethany Good, Dr. Mathew Good's wife, joins us for another edition of The Good Life with an introduction to yoga for anyone who has been interested in starting a practice. 

Please join us Saturday, September 19 at Whiteside Park (4009 S. Pittsburg Ave.) in Tulsa from 9 to 11 a.m. for a free yoga session to celebrate World AFib Awareness Day. The... Read More »

Each September two observances coincide – Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Awareness Month and National Yoga Month. Recently, Oklahoma Heart Institute has recognized these opportunities with events to educate the public on the most common heart arrhythmia in the United States and the benefits yoga can have for those who suffer from AFib. Last September, as dozens gathered at Guthrie Green in Tulsa and rolled out their red yoga mats, Rex Wilson, 53, eagerly waited to learn more from Oklahoma Heart Institute cardiac electrophysiologist Dr. David Sandler. “My heart was not in constant rhythm,” Rex... Read More »

Oklahoma Heart Institute cardiologist Dr. Mathew Good and his wife, Bethany, share their tips and strategies for striving to live a healthy life with a busy growing family. Today, Bethany joins us on the blog to share how they plan for kids going back to school and schedules once again, getting busy.

As much as we love the lazy days of summer - splashing in the pool, roasting s’mores and family road trips - I find myself craving the routine and consistency of a school day now that Labor Day Weekend has officially wrapped. Whatever your kids’ ages, from little ones going to preschool... Read More »

“I didn’t take it seriously,” admits Donnie Lord. “I thought, ‘that’s something I can deal with later.’” At 46 years old, Donnie thought he had more time to address his deteriorating health. “I was pretty unhealthy. I was overweight, out of shape. I smoked for 20 years – you name it.” The intersection of letting healthy living go by the wayside and a strong family history of diabetes and heart disease met Donnie head on in November of 2014. “I started having pressure in my chest that didn’t go away.” Donnie headed to the Emergency Department at Bailey Medical Center in Owasso, OK. Medical... Read More »

Three years ago we posed the question: “Can we wipe out heart attacks?” on our blog and made a case why the answer could be “yes.” At the time, we were learning more about the impact of the Dallas Heart Study on genetics and coronary atherosclerosis. Researchers determined from a pool of more than 6,000 people, that if you have very low LDL (bad cholesterol), you are unlikely to develop cardiovascular heart disease. Bottom line – 80 to 90 percent of all heart attacks could be eliminated (wiped out) altogether. Furthermore, what fueled this discovery – the existence of a gene mutation... Read More »